Hundreds honour Ron Anschuetz's life Friday | photos

United: Wagga High School students formed a guard of honour at the funeral of Ron Anschuetz on Friday. Picture: Les Smith.
United: Wagga High School students formed a guard of honour at the funeral of Ron Anschuetz on Friday. Picture: Les Smith.

The number of people Ron Anschuetz made an impact on during his life was evident at his funeral on Friday.

The raw emotion from more than 800 people was a powerful display of his passion as a teacher and dedication as a friend and father.

Students from Wagga High formed a guard of honour for the family to walk through on completion of the service.

Tears were flowing as the family and students caught each other eyes, remembering the man they had lost who always wanted people to reach their goals.

Mr Anschuetz was a beloved husband to Kristy and a father of three to Tom, Xander and Claire.

Kristy walked along the guard of honour, telling each student how proud she was of them and embracing them all.

Along with the usual service information, those who attended were also presented with a tribute book.

This book contained all the Facebook messages and comments sent remembering Mr Anschuetz by friends, family and students.

His teaching career didn’t start straight after he finished school, instead he started a science degree which he deferred to travel to London to visit his sister.

While living in London, he worked as a perfume salesman and at his sister's child care business.

His passion for sport was also evident while he was in London where he played semi-professional cricket.

Later he would joke with teachers at Wagga High that he played for England.

They would correct him by saying that playing in England wasn’t the same as playing for England.

Upon returning to Australia Mr Anschuetz was prompted to go back to university and complete his degree by his son, Tom, who he wanted to be able to provide for.

His first teaching job was at Mount Austin High, the same school he attended, before he gained a permanent position at Wagga High.

While his teaching methods thrilled students and made class fun, they were sometimes described as unorthodox and unpredictable.

On one occasion he needed ice cream containers for an experiment. 

He brought in a tub of ice cream for each table telling the students they would have to eat it before they could do the experiment.

Mr Anschuetz died on September 7 after a short illness.

Comments